Home > Identity Theft > Ego Surfing to Avoid Identity Theft

Ego Surfing to Avoid Identity Theft

egosurf

This past weekend, I went ego-surfing. It only took a few minutes to find a few sites with my personal information. One site offered information regarding addresses that I lived at when I was a kid. Many sites offered information about my parents and siblings. All sites had some misinformation, including job titles and salary history. Now, this isn’t the first time I’ve posted about the possibility of identity theft due to public sites offering up personal information. It’s been a few years, but my post, Here’s Looking Up Your Old Address! is still relevant today, so please check it out and take heed.

Also, please take a moment to ego-surf on various search engines and then contact sites to remove your information. Moreover, let them know you don’t appreciate your private information being made public. It’s not only an identity-theft issue, but also a personal-security issue.

Since my last post:

Spokeo.com put my information back up; today, I added the page link to a removal request, and I received a confirmation email. It will take 2-3 days to have the information removed from the site (and approximately 7-10 days from search engines).

Radaris.com shows my name and a couple of cities I lived in, but when I clicked on the link, the site states: Information removed.

PeopleSmart.com removed my info, but the company is now affiliated with Identity.com, so it’s back under a new account with various cities on both websites. I am currently trying to get the information removed but am encountering technical difficulties with their email submission webpage at the time of this posting. (I will update readers once information is available.)

Lastly, the most egregious (so far) is MyLife.com; I could not believe the amount of personal information on its page or the runaround I got from staff, requesting removal of said info. After trying to delete personal details online, I called and spoke with a very dismissive agent, then another, then a supervisor. Originally, I was advised it would take 7-10 days to have the info removed from their site; after threatening to contact a lawyer because of ID theft and personal security issues, I was advised the information would be removed from the site today and should be off the web (as much as it can be in the digital age) within 7-10 days.

Now, I’ll be contacting my family and friends, advising them to check this page for site links, so they can sort out their personal info on the web. Afterwards, I’ll follow up on these sites, again.

The police can’t protect consumers. People need to be more aware and educated about identity theft. You need to be a little bit wiser, a little bit smarter and there’s nothing wrong with being skeptical. We live in a time when if you make it easy for someone to steal from you, someone will. – Frank Abagnale

 

 

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